Living with Asthma
 
 

Asthma Support Groups

When someone is battling a disease such as asthma, it always seems to help to have a group of people available so that no one feels like they're going through these daily struggles alone. Thankfully, asthma is a condition that has been successfully managed by most who suffer from it given the remarkable advances made by medical science.

Regardless, dealing with a daily management issue that carries a somewhat significant risk can ultimately be a drain for anyone. As a result, support groups have been in existence for years to help those who struggle with asthma get past their rough spots and continue to successfully minimize the negative effects that this disease can have on anyone at certain times.

 
 

Below are a few examples of the asthma support groups that accomplish just that - they offer a place to share struggles, to listen to the struggles and triumphs of others, to share information that could be helpful – to serve as a resource for those who need it from time to time.

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

The AAFA is a non-profit group that was originally formed in 1953. It provides asthma patients and those who love them with support, information and just a place to vent and gain inspiration when necessary. The group offers several different regional chapters to serve as many people around the United States as possible.

Allergy & Asthma Network Mothers of Asthmatics (AANMA)

The AANMA is a lay organization that provides an opportunity for families of asthma sufferers to gather and network. Its goal is a bit unique in that it pursues donations and awareness to fight for the ultimate cure for asthma more so than the daily management of it. The AANMA was founded in 1985 and offers magazines and support lines for those who need it.

Daily Strength

Daily Strength is not necessarily limited to support groups for asthma, but is an online bulletin board/portal for all different types of health conditions. Some people do not have the time or the inclination to join a group and go to meetings, and Web sites like this one allow those who would like periodic help to discuss the disease and any topic that's relevant to the fight and the management of it.

Generally speaking, regardless of the type of battle you're fighting either on your own behalf or of a loved one, there is a support group out there that can help. Working with one is anything but a sign of weakness, but is rather a source of strength that shows that you are willing to do whatever it takes to make sure that your battle with asthma is successful.